Thinking in the Future: More on Haptics in Education

The use of technology in education is in its infancy. Many teachers are less media literate than their students. “Computer time” is restricted to media classes. Teachers who do incorporate the use of media in their instruction time do on their own rather than through any specified program. “The predominant form of technology use in most elementary school classrooms in the U.S. is PowerPoint presentations” (Hegedus 2013)

Still, even in it’s infancy the use of technology in education has come a long way since the use of projectors. Teachers today use Ipads, Promethean boards, and even iPhones in the use of classroom instruction. Assistive technology has become an important tool for many students with special needs. Assistive devices such augmentative communication devices have made education accessible for students who are unable to communicate verbally. Eye gaze communication boards, such as Tobii PCEye, have made education accessible for students with the inability to speak or move. Now by looking at a screen with the use of eye trackers and tablets, students who were trapped by their bodies, in the case of cerebral palsy or other disabilities,  can type, read, speak and learn with their peers.

Haptic devices look futuristic and intimidating. Educational technology is always changing. It is possible in the near future that the use of haptics for educational instruction will enter the classrooms, at the elementary and higher education levels. What would it look like to explore this possibility? How could the use of haptics be helpful in educational instruction? What would that look like?

How can haptics be helpful?

Media Literacy: A little bit of haptics education

Teaching using haptics technology

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